Cambridge had the pleasure of hosting a tour for AME presented by Paul Akers. We made a few stops during the tour to show off our “2 Second Lean” improvements around the facility. Here we would like to share some of the examples of employee genius at Cambridge. 

In this video, Johnathan Solter shows off the new carts used to transport units around the facility. They have gone from being clunky carts that must be welded and can only fit specific sizes to a one size fits all cart that anyone in the facility can build. This improvement showcases not only employee genius but the ability of our employees to work in unison across multiple departments. 

In this video, Conner Lalonde shows off the progress at the wiring stations. With the changes, he and others have implemented, the required motion has drastically decreased. As a result, individuals can gather any supplies they need within arm’s reach, plus can move stations should need be. 

In this video, SMegan Solter shows off the secondary RCS station that she put together. SMegan was given free rein to make the area however she would like. She has implemented better shelving, drawers, and organization in her area. 

In this video, Mathew shows off some of the improvements that have been made in the sheet metal department. By stepping up and trying a new cutting method, they have dramatically cut down on the amount of sheet metal waste that comes from forming parts. Mathew also shows off the new way of cutting RCS cans so that defects are less prevalent. 

Employee genius is something that Cambridge takes great pride in. These examples are only but a few of the many that occur. We display each of our improvements every day during our morning meeting. Please join us if you are interested in seeing these changes firsthand.

 

Continuous improvement plays a key role in the Cambridge culture - we are always striving to better ourselves and our processes. After learning about 2-Second Lean from Paul Akers and adopting it in our shop, we then explored the methodology of continuous improvement and found Kata. Most recently employees were introduced to it through the AME 750 and 24-week continuous improvement training. 


The structured practice of continuous improvement, Kata has proven to enhance our lean methodologies and give us the process to see a project through with enhanced outcomes.

In this video, Becca Jenkins does a great job of explaining how our Operations Engineering team uses Kata to improve different production lines and processes. Used first on our S-series HTHV heating line, employees formed teams and came together to create experiments. Through many experiments guided by Kata, we have been able to drastically cut down on the space required to perform tasks while also reducing the number of errors made during our processes. These improvements have been most recently implemented on our new paint line. Using Kata, we have identified ways to improve our line density with quality in mind.  That means we can load more parts in the same amount of space which means better line efficiency. Through Kata experimentation, we have learned how to deliver parts to the new paint line so that the loaders can hang the parts as efficiently as possible in the sequence that makes the most sense for processing the parts after they are painted and unloaded from the line.  These improvements are consistently being made to enrich the lives of our Cambridge colleagues.

During our morning meetings each day we share the latest improvements to give a space for employee genius to be celebrated and inspire other areas of the shop. If you would like to get a glimpse into our Kata process and culture of continuous improvement, please join us for a morning meeting. 
 

No matter the business, quality issues remain a factor. After all, quality impacts all aspects of a business and improving it is a big undertaking. At Cambridge, our method involves a focus on employee genius and continuous improvement.

The problem is in the process, not the individual

Throughout the day, employees track quality issues using a communal iPad. These issues are compiled into a report that is then shared in an open conversation each day with the entire production team. Most issues are presented with a picture and a clarifying description of the problem. Throughout the conversation, there is never a moment of blame or causing shame to an individual for a mistake. Cambridge believes that the process failed the individual. If the proper procedure was in place, then the quality issue would not have occurred. The best part is: the process can be improved.

Quality issues are then archived in order to identify reoccurring issues. Whenever quality issues become repetitive, the process must be evaluated. When this happens, a team of employees steps up to address the issue. Employees volunteer during the quality meeting and come together to find a solution. Rather than a supervisor telling them what they should do in order to fix it, Cambridge believes that those performing the job are the ones who will come up with the best corrective actions. This employee genius will allow for the process to be improved in the most effective way. 

Process improvement in real life 

One example of this was with the orientation of gas train components. There are shutoff valves (SVs) and safety shutoff valves (SSVs) that must be orientated to the correct direction to ensure proper functionality. The SVs and SSVs were configured incorrectly on a few occasions, and there was a significant risk if these components were not correct when shipped out into the field. A team of employees came together to correct this mistake and ensured the process would drive the solution. It was decided that after the gas train was installed, the gas train builder would place orientation indicators on the SV and SSV. Proper orientation now goes through multiple checks ensuring the process will not allow for failure and for an incorrect gas train to make it into the field. 

Making improvement a central idea to culture

Standardized workflows that clarify what must be done help our employees achieve high expectations of a quality product. The perfect people to develop these processes or improve them are those who do it every day by using their employee genius. Open conversations without the fear of punishment allow for all quality issues to be addressed. Cambridge employees understand that there is no shame in making a mistake. Embracing failure and prescribing solutions enriches the lives of our employees and of our valuable customers.

Come and join us

Each morning Cambridge goes over quality issues that had happened the previous day. We discuss what went wrong within the entire organization and share what improvements will be made to ensure it doesn’t happen again. Come and join us for a morning meeting to see this in action!

The first stop on the International Lean tour leading up to the Global Lean Leadership Summit was at Seating Matters in Northern Ireland. Just an hour and a half drive from Belfast in Limavardy, this company is transforming the future of healthcare seating for elderly and disabled persons.

We could go on and on describing what we saw – from their Lean improvements to their company culture – but we figured we would show you instead!

Everyone is Measuring to Target

To make sure that the daily throughput is met – Seating Matters has implemented a series of checkpoints and signage to keep a live tabulation of progress to goal.

They Made the Morning Meeting their Own

One of the best approaches to Lean is making it your own – building on what you’ve seen work at other companies and adjusting it to meet your goals and to inspire your team members. Seating Matters does an incredible job of being transparent in their progress and giving everyone an opportunity to discuss any struggles or successes they are encountering.

Their Lean Improvements are Everywhere!

Why didn’t we think of these?

The Video Cameras turned on us!

We had such high praise to give to the Seating Matters team – make sure to check out the observations video that they made while we were there!

 

Part of the personal growth effort of Cambridge includes encouraging each employee to feel more confident speaking in front of a large group and other public speaking opportunities. The "practice" of this improvement comes in the form of taking turns to Emcee the morning meeting that we hold out in the shop every day. Each Emcee can speak to whatever they'd like as the group stretches - some take the chance to talk about their families or hometowns, others give trivia and yet, others - like Steve, our Controller - take the opportunity to be creative. Watch the video below to see how Steve used his introduction time!