Manufacturing Day is a celebration of modern manufacturing meant to inspire the next generation of manufacturers. It’s a celebration that provides an opportunity to showcase all that manufacturing has to offer, and what it means for our country, our economy, and the lives of millions of Americans. 

This year for Manufacturing Day Cambridge had the privilege of hosting students from the Francis Howell school district. These students are individuals that are interested in pursuing a career in manufacturing or are intrigued by what options exist. They were able to take a tour of the plant, and engage with a few current Cambridge employees. Our team members shared their own career paths and what their experience has been like in the manufacturing industry. 

Cambridge also had internal celebrations for Manufacturing Day. We made it into a week of celebration to show appreciation for our hardworking team. In true Cambridge style we celebrated with lots of food as well as some new shirts. 

Manufacturing Day is a great way to engage the community and work on our goal of bringing glory and dignity to manufacturing. If you would like to see this first hand join us for a tour

Achieving SHARP certification (Safety and Health Recognition Program) is one of the most prestigious honors a small business can receive. SHARP recognizes small businesses that have used OSHA's consultation program and have shown they have operational excellence when it comes to safety. 

Cambridge first heard of SHARP through MODOL and the Missouri On-Site Safety and Health Consultation. We are a culture that puts safety first so we became very interested in SHARP certification. 

How Does a Business achieve SHARP certification?

Obtaining SHARP certification is a serious undertaking that requires dedication from internal staff and an investment of time and resources to achieve success.

To start, you can:

- Request a consultation visit that involves a complete hazard identification survey by calling 573-522-SAFE or filling out an On-Site Application

- Involve employees in the consultation process

- Correct all hazards identified by the consultant

- Implement and maintain a safety and health management system

- Agree to notify your state Consultation Project Office before making any working changes or introducing new hazards into the workplace. 

 

Planning for success means planning for obstacles

When we decided to begin this journey, we knew it was not going to be accomplished quickly or with little effort. We needed to create new rhythms and routines, that we had previously had to some degree, but not to the precise levels of a SHARP-certified company. 

This became evident in reviewing our job hazard analysis and training cadences. We had a steep learning curve when it came to creating new daily rhythms. This required consistent dedication from all employees and could not be completed by just a few individuals. 

Overcoming the challenges of this journey are not an easy burden for any organization. However, we found that a continuous improvement mindset of making small, impactful changes that add up to big results does help make this goal feel achievable.

The requirement to involve employees in the consultation process is something that is well suited for the Cambridge culture. We are a culture that challenges our employees to fix what bugs them. We believe everyone is best qualified to resolve the issues within their work area. This translates over into safety. No one is better suited to identify safety hazards and find resolutions in a work area than the employee who works there daily. 


Providing safe environments is above all else

Working to identify potential hazards before something dangerous happens is our responsibility as an employer of the 180 mothers, fathers, daughters, sons, sisters and brothers who go home to their families. 

We are committed to achieving SHARP certification, because at the end of the day, we know that providing a safe and healthy working environment for our employees needs to be our number one focus. 

Beyond intrinsic responsibility, a safe environment does impact the bottom line when each employee is able to fulfill their job duties without complication.

This journey can seem long and strenuous for an organization. We are still in the middle of our journey, but we are hopeful we will be able to achieve SHARP recognition by the end of the year. 

Our last bit of advice to companies considering SHARP recognition: reach out to local labor and industrial relations teams. They will work with you and provide audits so you can become more aware of the hazards in your work environment. Furthermore, host employee-led safety meetings regularly. These meetings allow employees to voice their concerns and collaborate for resolutions. 

Join us and ask us anything.

We commend any organization that wishes to start the path to SHARP certification. Join us for a tour to witness a culture that promotes continuous improvement and puts safety first. We would love to meet you.

 

 

In an effort to execute on our promise to grow our people and future leaders, we recently offered leadership training to our employees from the esteemed Dale Carnegie of St. Louis. Thirty-three teammembers took us up on it and graduated from the program. We are so proud of the courage that it took to commit and to "show up" and step out of their comfort zones for each and every training.

The video captures highlights of the program and the benefits from the investment from an individual and organizational level. 

 

If you want to learn more about why and how we encourage our employees to be courageously uncomfortable, please join us for a morning meeting

This article is written as a point of view from our Marketing Coordinator, Jesse Hummel.

Your first question might be: what is a workplace chaplain?

A chaplain is like a priest, pastor, or minister. However, they are not linked to any specific religious organization. They can provide support to whomever, regardless of religious affiliation. 

When life presents its unexpected challenges, having someone to talk to can go a long way. Cambridge provides chaplains that come in throughout the week to speak with employees. These chaplains operate on a purely anonymous basis, meaning whatever is said during conversation will not make its way around the company to others. They are there to listen to struggles and successes or engage in regular conversation. Chaplains do not operate as religious entities. They are not there to promote any specific religion but rather be  a positive resource. 

Experience with Chaplains

From personal experience, I can attest to the benefits of having a workplace chaplain. One morning I came into work with a negative attitude - my weekend was unpleasant, and I carried those feelings into the workplace. I could tell that these feelings had a negative impact on my mental health and my production at work. A few hours into my workday, one of our chaplains asked how I was doing. I shared with him the struggle I was enduring, and in return, he shared some words of encouragement. This interaction was quick but had undeniable benefits. I was able to feel relief from getting the negative experiences off my chest and ultimately was able to be more productive and concentrate on my work. 

Benefits of Chaplains in the Workplace

  • Resolve disputes: Any workplace with many people and personalities can experience quarrels and feelings of frustration. These issues are often minor disputes that can be resolved through conversation and likely aren’t taken to management due to fear of escalating the situation. Having a chaplain to talk through issues with can resolve these conflicts quickly. 

  • Culture: Having a chaplain promotes a positive culture. It shows employees that production numbers are not the only matter of importance. Employee mental health is a priority when chaplain services are provided. 
  • Safety: Carrying burdens can lead to feelings of stress and anxiety that act as a fog over someone; however, while in a manufacturing environment, you are frequently near a forklift or heavy machinery. If you are not present in the moment or aware of what is occurring around you, there is significant potential for an accident to occur. Chaplains can proactively relieve “the fog” leading to a safer environment. 

Studies show that approximately 90,000 hours of one’s life are spent in the workplace. For those in management, it is estimated that 30,000 of those hours are spent responding to a crisis. Having a chaplain in the workplace can help lighten the burden on those in management. They will have more time to focus on revenue, improving processes, and production. 

Come visit and ask us anything.

Having chaplains in the workplace is only but one of the ways in which we try to promote a culture of mental and physical health. Caring about the well-being of every employee is how we try to enrich our employees’ lives daily. As we’ve learned from other companies, we believe in a pay-it-forward and open our doors to visitors to experience our culture in our morning meetings – one of our favorite daily rhythms. 

This blog is written by Thomas Little, Sales Development Representative, speaking on his experience at the Build My Future trade show. 

Finding quality employees is a pain point that most companies currently struggle with. Therefore, new ways of finding talent are essential to remaining competitive in the current job market. The Build My Future trade show is one great way to engage with potential future employees. 

The Build My Future trade show started in Springfield, Missouri but now pans many states, including Arkansas, Florida, Iowa, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin. For the first time the trade show occurred in St. Charles, Missouri as well. This trade show consists of local organizations inviting high schoolers to spend a day learning about potential career paths. In addition, employers set up booths where they will have a hands-on activity that shows what individuals may be doing if they go into that field of work. 

The first Build My Future trade show was in Springfield, Missouri at the fairgrounds on 4/13. Approximately 2,700 high schoolers attended this event. I was blown away by the level of interest that was shown. Students were highly engaged and excited for an opportunity to learn more about potential career paths. Unfortunately, we do not have a location near Springfield, so I took the opportunity to speak with students about what is of interest to them. Many students said they are grateful to be exposed to options outside of a traditional 4-year university. 

We had our scale models of units for the Cambridge booth, some steel parts with a cordless pop rivet gun to piece the parts together, and material on what Cambridge does. 

On April 20th, I attended the second Build My Future trade show with Michael Harmon, M-line Team Lead, held at the St. Charles Family Arena. This was the first year that St. Louis has hosted, so the turnout was less than the Springfield event. There were around 900 students in attendance. Michael and I shared how Cambridge aims to enrich the lives of every life we touch, both internally and externally. I was surprised at the level of engagement that this messaging was met with. Students were highly intrigued by a company that cared for more than just profit margins. We also shared the different career opportunities that Cambridge offers and that we are all about growing our people. 

Those that showed high interest in our culture and what we do took our flyers, my card, and a flyer directing them to our website to apply. 

I also made some connections with a handful of opportunity and career centers in the St. Louis area that I will get in touch with our HR department. It was a terrific opportunity to meet interested prospective talent and share the Cambridge way with other people in our area.    

 

If you would like to learn about the potential career opportunities at Cambridge check out our careers page

There is likely a “Safety First” reference in every employee handbook in the United States. Every company wants to mitigate the chance that one of their own could get hurt or worse. While the work has been done to establish safe practices, the ability to translate a protocol into real-time, real-life risk reduction is often disconnected.

For us at Cambridge, while establishing safe practices by identifying and reducing risks have always been components of our training and day-to-day work, it is fair to say that we have not always effectively communicated the expectations to the entire organization – especially for those outside of operations. We are just now taking the steps to ensure that our protocols are communicatedunderstood and being practiced to truly make for a safe environment for the fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, husbands and wives that create our work community.

Identifying safety goals & our 2022 strategy

Our first step for improvement was to evaluate what we had in place and find opportunities for improvement in terms of the protocols themselves. 

In 2022, we are focusing on increased proactivity though job hazard analysis, identifying hazards as a metric and are working towards getting SHARP (Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program) certified. 

In terms of moving these strategies from paper to execution – it comes down to expectations. “Setting clear expectations from management about our priorities will help our employees understand what’s important and what our goals are. Employees who know that our organization values their health and safety are more productive. They can participate in the process to ensure we have a safe and efficient work environment” says Connor Lalonde, our Safety Coordinator at Cambridge. 

Educating through a six week internal communication campaign

As mentioned earlier, creating the safe procedures was generally the easy part for us. However, we had low recall and implementation among our employees. We needed to break it down to expected specific behaviors and translate the training to actionable items across departments.

Rather than a single intensive seminar, we decided to drip communication over half of a quarter could help with implementing and practicing learnings, and still leave room for mid-campaign questions and improvements.

Week One: Why safety is our highest priority at Cambridge

Week Two: Identifying the safe behaviors in our work areas

Week Three: Responding to safety incidents

Week Four: Our 2022 strategies for safety incident prevention

Week Five: Review of all the key concepts

Week Six: Close with a review and celebration of our safety culture

The design of the companywide communication was simple: each member of the organization tackled a weekly exercise with their team. To ensure proper guidance, people leaders were first introduced to the exercises with their own leaders and then would use that learning to help the team they manage through the same exercise.

To share learnings across teams, insight was shared via signage and in our daily morning meetings. The meeting emcees were also encouraged to share stories of incidents or “near misses” that help remind them why we are putting this work into being proactively safe.

What’s next?

Following the safety campaign Cambridge will celebrate with another key component of our culture: celebration. We will review the successes of the organization and ackowledge the advances we have made in workplace safety. 

This first companywide campaign kicks off the first of many internal campaigns Cambridge will work toward in this year, with later topics covering continuous improvement, quality, and leadership development. 

Join us for a morning meeting if you’d like more ideas on the daily habits of a safety and continuous improvement culture!

The Working with Dan Doriani podcast seeks to fire the imagination of Christians who long to practice their faith at work.The podcast features interviews of people who try to practice their faith at work. Guests may be famous or unknown. They may be very successful, quietly faithful, or instructive in their woes. We typically interview mature Christians, but there are exceptions. The common thread is a desire to live by one’s faith and convictions. Guests include professional athletes, award-winning broadcasters, a librarian, a surgeon, a Harvard-educated opioid addict, politicians, and more

John Kramer, Chairman and CEO of Cambridge Air Solutions, has made it his mission to restore glory and dignity to the manufacturing industry. He does this through a genuine, palpable care for his employees that manifests itself through both unconditional love and high expectations. He and Dan talk leadership, environmentalism, and how business people can cultivate healthy sustainable systems and organizations. 

Cambridge had the pleasure of hosting a tour for AME presented by Paul Akers. We made a few stops during the tour to show off our “2 Second Lean” improvements around the facility. Here we would like to share some of the examples of employee genius at Cambridge. 

In this video, Johnathan Solter shows off the new carts used to transport units around the facility. They have gone from being clunky carts that must be welded and can only fit specific sizes to a one size fits all cart that anyone in the facility can build. This improvement showcases not only employee genius but the ability of our employees to work in unison across multiple departments. 

In this video, Conner Lalonde shows off the progress at the wiring stations. With the changes, he and others have implemented, the required motion has drastically decreased. As a result, individuals can gather any supplies they need within arm’s reach, plus can move stations should need be. 

In this video, SMegan Solter shows off the secondary RCS station that she put together. SMegan was given free rein to make the area however she would like. She has implemented better shelving, drawers, and organization in her area. 

In this video, Mathew shows off some of the improvements that have been made in the sheet metal department. By stepping up and trying a new cutting method, they have dramatically cut down on the amount of sheet metal waste that comes from forming parts. Mathew also shows off the new way of cutting RCS cans so that defects are less prevalent. 

Employee genius is something that Cambridge takes great pride in. These examples are only but a few of the many that occur. We display each of our improvements every day during our morning meeting. Please join us if you are interested in seeing these changes firsthand.

 

Continuous improvement plays a key role in the Cambridge culture - we are always striving to better ourselves and our processes. After learning about 2-Second Lean from Paul Akers and adopting it in our shop, we then explored the methodology of continuous improvement and found Kata. Most recently employees were introduced to it through the AME 750 and 24-week continuous improvement training. 


The structured practice of continuous improvement, Kata has proven to enhance our lean methodologies and give us the process to see a project through with enhanced outcomes.

In this video, Becca Jenkins does a great job of explaining how our Operations Engineering team uses Kata to improve different production lines and processes. Used first on our S-series HTHV heating line, employees formed teams and came together to create experiments. Through many experiments guided by Kata, we have been able to drastically cut down on the space required to perform tasks while also reducing the number of errors made during our processes. These improvements have been most recently implemented on our new paint line. Using Kata, we have identified ways to improve our line density with quality in mind.  That means we can load more parts in the same amount of space which means better line efficiency. Through Kata experimentation, we have learned how to deliver parts to the new paint line so that the loaders can hang the parts as efficiently as possible in the sequence that makes the most sense for processing the parts after they are painted and unloaded from the line.  These improvements are consistently being made to enrich the lives of our Cambridge colleagues.

During our morning meetings each day we share the latest improvements to give a space for employee genius to be celebrated and inspire other areas of the shop. If you would like to get a glimpse into our Kata process and culture of continuous improvement, please join us for a morning meeting. 
 

Each year, on the first Friday in October, the manufacturing community opens its doors to the public. This is known as Manufacturing Day. Manufacturers try to give insights into the problems and solutions that the modern manufacturer faces. This year Cambridge had the pleasure of hosting an event on creators wanted that provided a glimpse into manufacturing. 

Cambridge believes that everyone has the ability to lead and just needs to right opportunity. We believe in growing our leaders from within using multiple avenues for this development. In the clip below our marketing ambassador, Tony Spielberg, goes into detail as to how we develop leadership across the company. 

The Cambridge Air Solutions brand and our commitment to “Enriching Lives” is more than a name, an icon, or a tag line. It is our promise to our people, our customers, and to our supplies, that Cambridge desires to make an impact on the world. 

Megan Solter, Jesse Hummel, and Thomas Little were panelists and provided a live Q&A segment. They go into detail on their experiences at Cambridge, and the ways in which the culture has impacted them. 

Please join us for a morning meeting if you have any questions, or would like to experience our culture first hand!